profiling cores

For discussions related to designing and making ski/snowboard-building equipment, such as presses, core profilers, edge benders, etc.

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101
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Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:25 am

profiling cores

Post by 101 » Sun Mar 10, 2019 5:25 am

Hello guys, first of all thank you for accepting me to the forum, I am a beginner in this fantastic hobby, I am interested in making snowboard, where I have more doubts is in the profiling of the core, I am going to buy my first wood machine and he asked me if a thickness planer type hammer A-3 41 cm could be good for profiling with a cradle, I want to do the profiling with the side walls abs attached to the wood, I appreciate help.

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MontuckyMadman
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Re: profiling cores

Post by MontuckyMadman » Sun Mar 10, 2019 12:19 pm

I think people have had luck with the helical style planer blades rather than straight blades.
They are much more expensive but worth it in the long run.
An overhead sander is more ideal.
Make the core longer than need to account for snipe.
Hot glue.
Spacer at the ends.
U can do it!
sammer wrote: I'm still a tang on top guy.

OAC
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Re: profiling cores

Post by OAC » Sun Mar 10, 2019 10:23 pm

@101: I just invested in a Felder AD741, not entirely for ski building but almost...:-). It's quite similar to the Hammer A3 41 you looking at. I don't know all the differences, but I choose the Felder for the electronic control of the planing table and it's more robust. I also choose the option with the "Silent cutter" or helical cutter MM refer to.
It's a hell of a planer/jointer!
...BUT...
Coming from a hobby planer/jointer which did it's job, but not 100% precise and one core at the time, to this brutal machine...I wasn't prepared!
First, I'm not convinced that the helical cutter is the obvious choice for planing ski/snowboard cores with a cradle. For every little cut it makes, it lifts the core a fraction of a millimeter, which is enough to make the core ugly/uneven/sniped or whatever. Using hot glue doesn't help that much. One other thing is the distance between the infeed roller - cutter - outfeed roller is longer than the old planer I had. It can be or maybe is an issue? It was a minor issue with my old palner(the distance was shorter). This is just my observations so far...
I have only owned it for a little more than a month. So I'm still in learning/discovering mode. I will probably solve it, but for now I'm a little disappointed...
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mammuth
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Re: profiling cores

Post by mammuth » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:25 am

Thats the problem i learned several years ago. Tried to use a big Felder too, not usable. The problem is the pressure rollers are too far apart from the cutter roller, so as you say it lifts the core. I dded up 3 boards before i found out the problem ;)

Its a great machine, i love to use it for making the raw cores. But for profiling its not usable
Tom

101
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Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:25 am

Re: profiling cores

Post by 101 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 1:22 am

Thank you very much to all for your answers, it is not a bad idea to try first with a manual router with side rails, to see how it is.

mammuth
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Re: profiling cores

Post by mammuth » Tue Mar 12, 2019 2:18 am

Yes, start with manual jig and later do the jump to cnc.

A big table saw and planer are nice, but just needed to do your own (raw) cores. And for that matter you can use the machines at a (friends) workshop. Much more cheaper then to spend $$$ on these machines. Money is better invested into a cnc
Tom

101
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:25 am

Re: profiling cores

Post by 101 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 2:41 am

good advice, thank you very much

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