Soul Skis

Document your personal work here. Show photos, movies, and share your secrets.

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Akiwi
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Post by Akiwi » Thu Dec 17, 2015 11:18 pm

Dr. Delam wrote:I am using the cork for vibration damping and simple filler. I cut it out to fit between the edges going right on top of the base. I also put a layer on top of the plastic tip spacer to match core thickness. This is my first pair using cork so I'll have a follow up after I ski them to see if I can notice anything different.
Ok, Thought that was where it would go. I'm sure you could create some interesting 3D effects with it under the topsheet too. Question is if it causes folds in the material.
I am nobody. Nobody's perfect, so I must be perfect.

skidesmond
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Post by skidesmond » Fri Dec 18, 2015 6:13 am

I've been using cork as a filler between the edges for awhile. No bonding issues so far. The cork I use is the same height as the metal tabs. This works great because there's no need to rabbet the core. Bases have been coming out flat.

As far as a damping material I haven't measured the effect so I can't say that it's a total game changer, but I would think it's providing some damping effects. If nothing else it saves me from rabbeting the core, a real PITA.

Skis look great!

Dream
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Post by Dream » Fri Dec 18, 2015 8:07 am

I have built one pair of skis using the same cork method as skidesmond and it is great to fill that void. I think there is at least some noticeable dampness from my skis without cork.

@skidesmond - Are you wetting it out like you would glass or other composites? My guess is probably not. I have been lightly skimming epoxy on the upper surface after I place it in the layup, but not measuring out epoxy specific for the cork. I feel there is enough epoxy on the bases and in the glass that sits on top of the cork layer.

skidesmond
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Post by skidesmond » Fri Dec 18, 2015 10:08 am

Dream wrote:I have built one pair of skis using the same cork method as skidesmond and it is great to fill that void. I think there is at least some noticeable dampness from my skis without cork.

@skidesmond - Are you wetting it out like you would glass or other composites? My guess is probably not. I have been lightly skimming epoxy on the upper surface after I place it in the layup, but not measuring out epoxy specific for the cork. I feel there is enough epoxy on the bases and in the glass that sits on top of the cork layer.
I skim coat it too. There's enough epoxy on the FG and base to bond it altogether.

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Sat Dec 19, 2015 2:19 am

I bumped up my epoxy quantity just to be sure I had enough but I didn't really need to. I wet it all out and still had plenty left. Lesson for next time. Each build is still a learning experience.

The core to tip spacer stapling worked well. I still suck at getting graphics aligned perfectly though. It's hard to reposition once everything is wet out and wanting to stick together. Maybe I'll try putting down some dowels first.

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Sun Mar 13, 2016 4:11 am

I made these a few months ago but realized I didn't put up any pics or build report. Cold Smokes - 135-115-125 with a 27 meter sidecut radius and 185 cm length.

Cores are oak, poplar, fir, with maple sidewalls. I didn't rabbet the core and used a cork layer between the edges as filler. I don't think I notice the dampness effect but they are heavier which will inherently make them damper.

I was shooting for a reverse camber that matched the sidecut profile similar to what 4frnt is doing. I didn't want to make a special mold so I tweaked the camber after pressing. I used blocks to decamber the tips and tails and clamped it to my bench underfoot. The reverse camber came out as close to perfect as I hoped. 10 mm in the tip and 5 mm in the tail. I couldn't get a picture of the camber against the sidecut without someone holding the skis and didn't have anyone handy to assist.

I am now a firm believer that matching sidecut to reverse camber works very well. If you stay centered on your skis it engages the whole ski consistently when you roll it over. I was amazed how well these carved on soft groomed snow. I built these to ski off piste but they really do well getting you back to the lift on the groomer returns. It was almost as if they felt like they weren't reverse camber. They also carved a much tighter turn than I anticipated. Since the ski is already in a decambered shape it decreases the effective turn radius.

I've skied these in deep pow and spring slush and they like anything soft. Hard pack and ice, not so much. Today I'll be skiing them in 18" new but tomorrow I think the Surfers will be coming out as there is another 2 feet forecasted for tomorrow night.

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Fri Apr 29, 2016 10:52 pm

I tried coloring the wood sidewalls of a few pair of skis earlier in the year and now they look like crap. I used a Minwax black stain on some bamboo and first off it didn't penetrate that well and took several coats to even look consistent. I also used a black Sharpie pen on some maple sidewalls and this method was actually easier and better looking.

But after a few days of skiing the color starts coming off from the friction of the snow and they look shitty. My advice is to not bother unless you are really bored and like redoing it all the time.

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Sat Oct 29, 2016 12:39 am

I made this pair to show my support for a local organization, Keep Squaw True, that is fighting the ridiculous development plans for Squaw Valley. Unfortunately a few years ago Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows were sold to a company, KSL, that has no idea how to run a ski area.

This pair I used the template for my favorite everyday skis, the Nukes. I used a different tip mold to make the tip a little higher and changed to an all bamboo core. I picked up a couple sheets of bamboo from Slant Skis to simplify my cores and speed up the process a bit. We'll see how I like them. Hopefully I'll be skiing them in a couple weeks. Lots of rain in the Sierra now that just needs to get a little colder.

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falls
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Post by falls » Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:07 am

looking good!
Don't wait up, I'm off to kill Summer....

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vinman
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Post by vinman » Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:55 am

Awesome stuff as always DD
Fighting gravity on a daily basis
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OAC
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Post by OAC » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:46 pm

I was in Squaw the season 1983 - 84. Time to go back?
On the hunt for the perfect turn....
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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Wed Nov 02, 2016 1:11 am

Winters have been inconsistent the last few years. Long range forecasts are always wrong as well. But when it's good, it's really good!

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:24 pm

I just picked up this little gem, Grindrite ST600 and am super stoked to have it in my garage. It's a real workhorse and gets skis flatter than the Winterstiegers that I have worked on. Having the platen is the key I believe.

I picked it up from the local SVST/Reichmann sales guy and got a bridge, some belts and emulsion with it.

I would love if there was a fence to do side edge grinding. Anybody ever build one to add on?

Happy tuning! :D

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stormyclouds
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Post by stormyclouds » Sat Oct 21, 2017 8:07 am

I bought the same machine last spring and I'm still getting to know it. What doesn't make since to me is the auto feed roller is only utilizing the rubber roller instead of the platen. Can someone explain? I don't have that round bar over my platen, does that have something do with it? Thanks!

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Dr. Delam
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Post by Dr. Delam » Sun Oct 22, 2017 12:57 am

So here is my take on how it functions although I have been only been working on it a few times. The roller over the platen is only utilized when using the feed wheel and it keeps the board off the platen. You don't need it at all as long as you angle your boards to keep it off the platen when using auto feed. I keep mine up out of the way.

The way I figure it is that the platen wouldn't work well with a feed roller over it. For example, if your board is base high and your top sheet is concave, it will push the board flat taking equal amounts of material across the board and not accomplishing what you want. Same if your base is concave and topsheet convex. The best way that I found to get a flat base is to use an aggressive belt with less pressure with your hands fore and aft of the contact point on the platen so you are not distorting the board. Hope this makes sense. I was amazed at how flat I got my bases using this method. It takes patience and a lot of periodic checking of the whole base with a true bar.

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