Here's a mad experiment that seems to work.

For discussions related to ski/snowboard construction/design methods and techniques.

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Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

nearls wrote:Been curious about cutting fish scales into the ptex of a split deck. Cross country skis still seem pretty fast going downhill. Could possibly use a router jig to cut a similar pattern to yours huck, just couldn't be as pronounced due to ptex thickness. Could still have the option to put skins on when the trail rears up and you really need them. Ditching the skins would be pretty sweet on the change overs. +1 for short and stout boards here too. Quick turns in tight places.
The router jig is worth a try. Leaving smooth p-tex along the edges would make a better seal so snow doesn't get under the skins.

Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

I'm wondering if we could rout p-tex stock and temporarily stick to the board with double sided tape or something for tests. It would be nice to try a base with less scales.

doughboyshredder
Posts: 1353
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2007 7:37 pm

Post by doughboyshredder »

The scales have already been done. Many years ago. Forget the thread, but it's here if you look for it. I think someone may have mentioned it already in this thread.

karmav
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Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 11:25 am
Location: Sandpoint, ID
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Post by karmav »

Here is a link to our fishscale skis. We will have a video up soon showing them in use.
http://www.7bskis.com/index.php?option= ... &Itemid=57

Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

Thanks for the link. I'm still braining on my board for next season. I think it'll have a pocket in the base for a section of skin right under your foot when climbing. And some fishscales in strategic places. I tried making scales with a razor sharp chisel and they came out really slick. No fuzzy edges from routing. That way I can add more if I start out with too few.
Ps Your skiis look REALLY nice but the routed scales look a bit slow in the way they don't blend into the running surface.

karmav
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Location: Sandpoint, ID
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Post by karmav »

Not sure what you are seeing, the scales do flush out. The router jig is on an angle that puts a 1mm at the front to flush at the rear scale in the base. of course any time you do something that compromises a perfectly smooth base you will cause drag and slow down the ski, but this is most noticeable on groomed runs. I rarely notice much difference in powder where these are meant to be.
Good luck with your project.

Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

I agree powder doesn't drag much. I tried going downhill with skins on my board and was happy how well it slid.
The trailing edge of your scale pockets meet the running surface of the base with an angle instead of a smooth transition. As long as you're happy with them that's all that matters.

andrey
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:59 am

Post by andrey »

You may use just a flat wooden base without fish-style shape. If you make a special-type of steps when going uphill, skis will not lose cohesion with show.
There is two secrets for it:
1. When you raise a ski, do it carefully and perpendicularly to snow surface without sliding
2. Powerfully put a ski on the snow, with hearable clap.

After several of such steps, there will be certain amount of adhered snow to a ski surface, that will prevent it from sliding. After a certain practice, you will be climbing rather steep slopes. It does not depends on a temperature.

jlindy86
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:23 am
Location: Santa Clarita, CA

fish scales

Post by jlindy86 »

First time poster here trying to play catch up, but has anyone found base material with the 'positive' fish scales?
or
Has anyone tried making their own bases with positive fish scales?
My thought has been to make a mold with negative fish scales (plunge router), heat up the kick-zone of a base, and press the scales into the base.

Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

Image
fish scale test b 001 by Huck Pitueee, on Flickr

Some European company supplys fishscale. Someone one Skibuilders posted where. Here's this years test. Hand cut steps. Great for getting around on very low angle stuff. Skins just rule in all conditions. The drag of scales isn't worth it. I did have a fun pow day on the first test board a while back. Climbs fine, goes down allright in pow. It was nice not to deal with skins and the board felt really light climbing.

knightsofnii
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Post by knightsofnii »

Huck Pitueee wrote:http://vimeo.com/38662068
Here's todays test. Low visibility so I couldn't cut loose. So in sticky fresh snow the skinless climbed well but felt about 15% more drag on the downhill. At 2 minutes in the vid I switch to the 135cm full rockered board made for these conditions. Very fun to ride. It is really similar to a true fish surfboard.
So when you make the switch, what did you do with the other deck?
Doug

Huck Pitueee
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:51 pm

Post by Huck Pitueee »

knightsofnii wrote:
Huck Pitueee wrote:http://vimeo.com/38662068
Here's todays test. Low visibility so I couldn't cut loose. So in sticky fresh snow the skinless climbed well but felt about 15% more drag on the downhill. At 2 minutes in the vid I switch to the 135cm full rockered board made for these conditions. Very fun to ride. It is really similar to a true fish surfboard.
So when you make the switch, what did you do with the other deck?
I left the test board at the bottom and used the other board with skins for climbing.

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